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Senior UX Designer

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Our client is an international domain registrar and web hosting company looking for a Senior User Experience Designer to join their team in Belgrade. Read more...

Scrum Master

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How to hire a suitable tech recruiter

You don’t have to be a recruiting expert or a hiring master mind to know there are certain rules and requirements that need to be obeyed and fulfilled in order to have a fully functional and above all motivated team. Welcoming new members aboard can get surprisingly difficult sometimes (even if you followed all the instruction and your instincts too). Recruitment agencies are there to help you avoid these situations, but you should acknowledge the fact they’re not unmistakable either.   The good news is that chances of having hiring doubts and problems can certainly be minimized (let’s not be pretentious and speak of completely eliminating these odds, at least for now). Good HR strategy can substitute the usage of crystal ball and help you spot potential problems before they actually occur.    And you’d need the right staff to create a successful staffing strategy. There’s a whole set of rules and distinctions when it comes to recruiters too. What does it take to succeed as a tech recruiter? Dedication with a dash of gazing  First indicator of crafty (and hirable) IT recruiter is patience. Recruiting, when being done properly, requires time. If someone’s willing to tiptoe around a LinkedIn profile (and possibly around other social media profiles - no stalking potential intended), plus to be regularly checking out other platforms and sources, he might be a keeper. This patient tech recruiter will look into (almost) everything that can possibly be useful and found online. He’ll track down information about candidates (and clients when needed) and he’ll categorize it carefully and methodically.    Keeping colleagues in loop and keeping files, CVs, documents and information organized will contribute to success of the whole team involved in recruiting and hiring (no matter how big or small the team might be). Even if there’s one single recruiter working for you, his behavior and competence (or the lack of it) might easily effect the entire company.    So - Don’t choose a sloppy recruiter, he’s almost destined to mix up names and available positions and the next thing you know – you’re hiring a Senior Ancient Greek Satyr (priceless for development of 5th century B.C. theater but inexplicably bad if you’re developing a team of IT experts).    And here’s the thing – every recruiter should examine those professional (and/or social) networks. But he has to know about boundaries and make sure never to cross certain lines.    The thin line between being thorough and plain scary  The worst case scenario – a recruiter being desperate and needy. If a recruiter messes up big time and confuses a bunch of stuff, or seriously mispronounces some names and tech terms – there’s still a possibility they’ll miraculously manage to persuade a developer into considering their job offer. However, being winy or tedious will surely get them a one way ticket to “seen”.     If you’re looking to hire a tech recruiter, make sure he knows how to deal with deadlines, stress and ultimately – each recruiter must know how to communicate and distinguish persistence from perpetual, compulsive texting. The kind of individual that’s willing to exchange quality for quantity is very much likely to send texts without true substance (which will lead to extremely poor response rate, and then back to more pointless texting).   Yes, recruitment gets difficult sometimes, the market keeps getting more competitive and everyone’s in a hurry to hire. But this is no excuse for anyone to come off as borderline obsessive. Following up every now and then is a must, just make sure they know the frequency limit before they end up characterized as literal head-hunters.   (x) Cold-calling is out of the question. (x) Emailing or texting until you’re blocked, banned, or ostracized are not allowed. (x) Generic texts and copy-paste messages aren’t welcome. (x) Irrelevant information and redundancy are inadequate and will most likely be ignored.   The importance of questions and coffee Recruiter is indirectly taking part in your employer branding. This is the person that should represent your company with all its’ values. They need to be fully aware of the priorities and they should be asking questions about basically everything.    Be specific about what truly matters so they can spread the word.  Let’s imagine for a moment you’re contemplating a career change. You’re receiving some offers and this really poetic text hits your mailbox. You’re being informed about some utopia among IT companies, everyone there has some cool Tolkien - like title and they’re all having so much coffee you can’t help but wonder if the job’s actually on a plantation.  Feeling special because you received an offer like this yet? Of course not, you know better. So does a (potentially) good recruiter.   Attention, employers! Do not withhold information from our fellow recruiter. If the employer (or some other person in charge) doesn’t provide a recruiter with the necessary information, the result might sound like random babbling about unicorns, rock stars, vegan burgers etc.    Recruiter needs to be all about the questions.  And they need to be well informed and up to date. You should be looking for a tech oriented HR enthusiast who’s asking the right kind of questions and who’s able to correctly rank benefits from “very important” to “wow, look – a doormat that glows in the dark”. It’s easy to spot a person who’s eager to learn and develop new skills. Successful recruitment has very little to do with seniority itself sometimes. Have this in mind while hiring: Experience does not necessarily equal the amount of time spent doing something. They should be asking significant questions, and so should you. 
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The difference between remote and freelance jobs

The number of people in favor of remote jobs is increasing fast these days. This type of employment is especially popular among tech related people – developers and other IT experts, but IT recruitment agencies too. It’s no wonder this kind of employment is getting lots of attention and positive reviews because there’s so much good to it. Working from home or from a remote location does necessary require more discipline and lots of planning, and it certainly doesn’t work perfectly for everyone, but it has the goods to back up all of its shortcomings. This time we’ll focus on similarities and crucial differences between working remotely and freelancing. Many people struggle while deciding which one would suit them and their lifestyle, while others are just not sure about the accurate meaning of these terms. And who could blame them, it's hard to tell the difference.  One thing is almost axiomatic – all tech talents are looking forward to working from home at least every once in a while, and most of them would gladly try their luck working for a remote client. Many HR departments and recruitment teams can verify the accuracy of this theory. Staffing agencies are often asked by developers and IT experts if they have job openings of this kind. Remote and freelance jobs are seemingly alike, but there are some pretty significant factors that separate them. It wouldn’t matter where you are located or what you’re wearing for neither one of these jobs. You are trustworthy and reliable, you have the skills and the enthusiasm, you have a fully functional computer (or another weapon of choice) and the internet access. These are the inevitable premises to succeed working remotely or as a freelancer. So, both remote and freelance career choices will provide you with a great deal of freedom. But to work remotely actually does mean to be “conventionally hired”. Everything is pretty much regular, there’s a contract involved and the working hours are often implied (probably flexible, negotiable or part-time but still - they’re often mandatory). The only thing that’s excluded from the deal is the office. Contracts and obligations A fully remote job means to be hired by a company or an organization. It is a home-based job but it involves constant virtual presence via communication channels like Slack, Skype, Hangouts and sometimes even using employee monitoring softwares, such as Time Doctor. Although companies don’t require developers that work remotely to physically make an appearance, they do need to be present. Their work would be evaluated from time to time and they would be communicating continuously with everyone working on the project.  Just like any employee, you would get an assignments and your responsibility would be to complete successfully. To be a freelancer does equal to have all the autonomy and liberty to make decisions about projects and/or clients. And this autonomy also means they’re not bound by contracts in majority of cases and they can turn down a job offer at any time. Freelancers, however, don’t have this type of obligations. Their jobs have nothing to do with working hours, they schedule all of the activities and assignments the way they find convenient. It usually involves fulfilling tasks during a period of time that’s been previously agreed. Once you are done, you are free to move to the next project. And their work is being far less monitored by a client. It’s actually almost the other way around – freelancers sometimes need to present their own ideas to make things work.  The selection process If you are using platforms like Upwork or Freelancer you know how hard it is to land a freelance job these days. Most of the time, lowest bids win. On the other hand, companies that hire remotely usually have two things on mind: (1) do you have the hard skills to do the job and (2) can you communicate efficiently within a remote team? This usually leads to a way more rigorous selection process. You will apply for a remote position and you will have to prove the requirements on interviews, tests and more interviews. Hiring remote team members requires a well structured selection process. The thin line between freelancing a working remotely lies in the fact that.. Developing a long term relationship with the client on your freelance job may turn into a full time remote position. Can you tell the difference now? The Uncertainty The coolness factor of freelancers’ life is mixed with the uncertainty. They have only themselves to rely on when it comes to finding a client. The source of income might not always be available and this kind of crises is what makes everything shaky and stressful. This is probably the reason why remote job feels more secure and might turn out to be a better option for some.   [caption id="attachment_220" align="alignleft" width="300"] Nope. Nothing out there.[/caption]   You will have to plan every single detail. There are those situations that are completely out of your control and can make you look unprofessional. We were coming back from a weekend get away with the idea to have a call with an important candidate during a stop on a gas station. Our car broke down in the middle of highway. We had no signal, so we couldn't even let the candidate know we can't make it. We also didn't have water, but that's another story. (Please take lots of water when traveling by car). The Loneliness The downside to both freelance and remote positions is that people might get lonely or bored at some point. Luckily, these problems are easy to overcome. The trick is to maintain a high level of concentration and dose the amounts of other daily needs and interactions. It just takes time get used to working from home. Once you work out a strategy to be productive and don’t miss out on the fun stuff, you’ve got it all. You’ll do what you like and what you do best and be appreciated by your pen friend boss, even though you’re working from the living room couch with your socks turned inside out or from under a coconut tree.  What’s your story? Would you be interested in working from home or from an unusual location you always wanted to visit? 
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LinkedIn Guide: How to Make Recruiters Come to You

Did you know that there is more than 20 million open jobs and 590 million members on LinkedIn right now? It may look like it would be easy for you to find a job, but you won’t be noticed unless you start thinking strategically. What does “thinking strategically” mean? First of all, your profile has to be visible to recruiters. If your profile cannot be found on LinkedIn, you have a serious problem. Secondly, you have to find a way to keep IT recruiters on your profile and make them want to contact you. So, it’s not about how lucky you are, but how wisely do you use your LinkedIn profile. The great news for you is that you can rank more highly for the types of jobs you’re most interested in if you think strategically. How do IT recruitment companies hunt for professionals? Think about how you hunt for a job. You probably search for some keywords, job title, location, and industry. The same is with recruiters. You get a list of jobs, while they get a list of people who they can match with a job. Just as you don’t click on every job opening, recruiters pick only those candidates who are the most appealing and relevant to their search. So, what exactly do they do? They select the most important skill required for the job they are filling.They type in the job title they expect their perfect job candidates to haveIf the position is not remote, location is a significant factor for them. Recruiters usually prefer local candidates.They type the keywords into a search box They may use some other options such as industry or education. They get a list of possible matches and then the negotiation begins! So, if you want recruiters to contact you, your profile should be on the first or second page of their search. However, your profile should be optimized well in order to be visible on in search results. You have to stand out from other candidates, so you better start working on improving your profile. You have to find a way to keep IT recruiters on you LinkedIn profile Basics: Here is what you have to do in order to get “complete profile” status: Upload profile photoAdd industry and locationYour current position2 past positions you’ve heldYour education3 skillsIndustry & postal code50 or more connections Also, it will be better for you if you make your profile public and create your own link (and it will take you only 60 seconds to do so). However, basics are not enough if you want IT recruiters to contact you. Let’s dig deeper into LinkedIn algorithm and mind of recruiters. How can you improve your LinkedIn profile? 1. Choose headline and job titles smartly Your headline and current or recent job title is the first thing recruiters look for, but they’re important for LinkedIn’s search algorithm as well. It’s the major piece of information seen in search results alongside the name and profile photo. Make sure you have specific job title and headline because "Multi-skilled Professional" won’t tell anything to them. Use the full potential of these 100 characters that you can use for the job title. Be specific, but describe what you do. Incorporate common terminology used in your industry, use some buzzwords that can help recruiters find you. However, LinkedIn’s search engine is not smart enough to understand synonyms. So, if your job title is uncommon, you may consider a hybrid title, or you can break it down into its parts. For example, you can write Senior Software Engineer I Java Developer. 2. Think about where would you like to work Yes, your skills are important, but recruiters will first contact candidates who are more likely to accept their offer. They usually target local candidates at the beginning and set their advanced search to only bring up candidates living within a 25-mile radius of the company. So, if you’re willing to move because of the work, you should consider changing your zip code. Think about where would you like to work or which city offers the best jobs from your field. Further, you should specify which cities you’re willing to relocate. Just go to “Career interests” settings and update your location preferences and other settings. However, if you don’t add your location on the LinkedIn profile, you might not show on IT recruitment agencies localized searches. Think about where would you like to work or which city offers the best jobs from your field 3. Pick the right keywords Although keywords listed in your “Skills & Endorsements” section are searchable, they are not as important as those in your headline, job titles or job description. Recruiters usually have a list of buzzwords for a specific job, so if they want to find a front end developer, they will search for people who know CSS, HTML, JavaScript, etc. Remember, keywords have the most significant impact on LinkedIn search ranking, so you better put the right keywords in different sections of your profile. 4. Be creative in the summary section Are you aware of the fact that you have to brand yourself as a professional who is confident, passionate about the job and who is reliable? In the summary section, you have an opportunity to be creative and stand out from others. Put a bit of your personality and voice and show recruiters that there is a person standing behind the profile. Write about who you are, what do you want from a job and what your experience is. Once recruiters come to your profile, it’s important to keep them, so you better be creative. Also, write those keywords we talked about earlier in summary as well.   5. Show off your skills in the experience section Have you already added relevant job experience on your LinkedIn profile? Recruiters are looking for people with certain types of experiences. As mentioned, they will do a keyword search but that only searches the work experience part of your profile. Your LinkedIn profile is your resume, so describe the positions just as you would do in it. If you’re a beginner, add a volunteering experience or some projects that you did on your own. Build an Online Presence and Make Connections as a Junior Developer: How to Start? 6. Choose professional photo When headhunters search for a potential employee, the first few things they’ll see are the headline, your name, and your profile photo. There is a more possibility that they will visit your profile if you have a profile picture, so you better upload it. But don’t put just any photo on your profile. You want to look professional, so make sure that your picture is clean, simple, and that you wear appropriate clothes. Also, your photo should be up-to-date because it might make you seem deceptive if you meet someone in person. Nevertheless, you don’t need to get a professional headshot, but you do need a photo that shows your face clearly. Here is an extra tip - choose a brightly colored background that isn’t distracting. 7. Connect with professionals It’s not only about the number of connections you have, but who you’re connected with. The more common connections you have with a recruiter, the higher your profile will be in the results when they search the specific keyword. Degrees of connections are also important because recruiters are more likely to connect with you if you have some connections in common. Start with people you know, but don’t stop there. It’s important to connect with professionals from your field of work, not only locally, but internationally. 8. Check spelling and grammar In the end, check spelling and grammar mistakes because this can be a huge red flag for recruiters. There are a number of free grammar apps, so you don’t have an excuse. Also, if you misspell a keyword, recruiters won’t be able to find you. There is even a better reason for you to check grammar. According to research, professionals whose profiles contained fewer mistakes achieved higher positions. So, ask a friend to check your profile or use some app that can help you find mistakes. Conclusion: Be an active member of the community Don’t just create a profile, never log on ever again, and expect that jobs will magically come to you. The thing is that you should be an active participant on LinkedIn if you want to be noticed by recruiters. So, comment posts, join groups, write articles or share things that are trending in the industry. Always keep your profile up-to-date and write keywords in every section of your profile (but not to much of them). You have to think about both the LinkedIn search algorithms and the recruiters themselves, so think strategically, and recruiters will keep coming to you. We are always looking for high-level IT professionals. Let us help you find a job!
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Developers Burnout: Why you Have to Take it Seriously?

How do you feel about your job? Do you feel dreaded or happy about new challenges? Yea, it’s normal if you sometimes feel unmotivated, but if this condition continues, you better watch out! You may be close to burnout! Every programmer got close to get burnout at least once in their career. If you think that can’t happen to you, you’re wrong. It happened to the best programmers, so it’s essential to prepare and stop it on time. Some strange feeling goes through your veins, you’re procrastinating your tasks, find excuses not to work, struggling to perform tasks, or simply working so hard, feeling so stressed all the time, and don’t have time for yourself. A burnout story: What are the signs? High-achievers often expect a lot from themselves, so they keep working long hours and put enormous pressure on themselves to excel. However, sometimes your condition is not chronic: “A standard burnout is extremely easy to spot. If you suddenly don't feel like doing something you don't normally have a problem doing, it could be only 2 things: you're lazy or depressed today or you're working too hard and need a break. Hint: take that break.”Miloš Đekić, CTO of ClickGUARD If this is the case, you can quickly stop it and try to concentrate on the purpose - what motivates you and what attracted you to start coding in the first place. Nevertheless, sometimes you just can’t see how close you are to get burnout. “A deep burnout comes like a thief in the night. It's like a lonely cancer cell, dormant until something kicks it and it starts its mayhem. It won't offer warning signs and it won't offer any understanding when it happens. You have to have introspective and always think about where you are now, what you are doing, why you are doing it, what you have to tolerate in order to keep doing it, do you really want all that… and when you can't answer one of those questions or the answer does not bring peace - the big one is close,” continuous Miloš. That burnout comes unexpectedly proves the story of co-founder of GrowIT Tech Aco Gagić: “I didn’t realise what is happening, my body started fighting against me. I started feeling strange and had no energy, it was a strangely unpleasant feeling. The culmination happened when I felt so bad, that I had to go to a hospital. I spent the whole day sleeping, on infusion. After that, I was OK, but it made me analyze what had happened. I was under a lot of stress, had  too many things to do, so I started losing myself.” A deep burnout comes like a thief in the night According to Psychology today, these are signs of burnout: Chronic fatigue - lack energy feeling physically and emotionally exhausted, drained, and depletedInsomniaForgetfulness/impaired concentration and attention. Physical symptoms - chest pain, heart palpitations, shortness of breath, gastrointestinal pain, dizziness, fainting, and/or headachesIncreased illnessLoss of appetiteAnxietyDepression Anger - interpersonal tension and irritability which may turn into angry outbursts and serious arguments with others As you can see, these are the signs of physical and emotional exhaustion, and if you don’t have it, it’s great. You shouldn’t fear of it just because it might happen to you. But keep these warning signs in mind and remember that burnout is an insidious creature that creeps up on you as you're living your busy life. Luckily, there is a solution. But let’s see what can cause a burnout first. What can cause the burnout? 1. Death march projects Maybe you heard about this kind of projects, or maybe you’re working on the one right now. They are usually causing progressively worsening feelings of emotional and physical fatigue. Why? They have a fixed and immovable scope, timeline and resources available to get it done and everyone knows that it’s not achievable, but management doesn’t want to hear it. Furthermore, they get progressively worried and loses trust in its people. You keep working, but you struggle to understand the value of the project. You just can’t see the light, so you start questioning your accomplishments. If your boss doesn't give you an opportunity to slow down, IT recruitment companies can help you find a better job 2. Working long hours The cycle becomes work, work, work, sleep, no time for yourself. You keep working even on evenings and weekends. Your boss may be impressed by you, but they keep giving you more work to do. After a while, you just feel exhausted and begin to deliver a little less than what you used to deliver. You feel bad about it and you get lost in the code. 3. You’re not making any progress Your job is no longer stimulating for you. Maybe you’ve been in the company for years, and you feel like you’re not going forward. There are no challenges, you’re not learning, or your manager doesn’t give you an opportunity to learn new technologies. You’re stuck. Doing the same tasks, again and again, can make you question your career path. All of these things cause a high level of stress. You stop valuing your work and keep procrastinating. Many questions keep crossing your mind and you have no answers. Should I quit my job? Why am I doing it? How did I get in this phase of my career? Should I try something else? You know that you’ve loved your job once, but you just can’t remember why. Burnout grows slowly and builds up a little step at the time and you feel a lack of control. How to avoid burnout? It’s harder to fix burnout once you’ve been deep in it for weeks or months, but it’s not impossible. You will have to work on yourself and set some boundaries. According to Đekic, the recipe is this: “Detach from the cause of burnout, rest, relax, pray or meditate, spend time with family and friends. Literarily like for any other painful thing in life... It works.” However, sometimes it’s not that simple. “Unfortunately the real consequences of a serious burnout are felt with a delay, so we need to do everything in our power to avoid it. Both mental and physical health are seriously endangered today, especially in tech workplaces”, said Đekic. Aco Gagić said that it’s important to listen to your body. “Signs are everywhere, so I am trying to follow them. Before anything else, I’m working on myself in order to avoid stressful situations and burnout in general”, said Gagić. Let’s see some other tips that can help you avoid burnout. Determine your boundaries Maybe your boss can work for a whole day, but if you can’t, that’s OK. However, you have to define how many hours you can stay productive and let people know about your limits. If you need a break, you take it! Don’t compare yourself to others, because every person is different. Furthermore, don’t commit to doing something if you know that’s not possible. Ask for help when you have a deadline because if you keep working above you “too much” point, you’ll get burnout. Next, your boss and organization have to know what are your non-negotiable terms. If you define your boundaries, no one will expect from you to give more than you can. Sure, you want to be useful when there is a deadline coming, but if the company keeps expecting from you to work long hours, you will have to say something. If your limits are not compatible with the company’s expectations, maybe you should consider finding a new job. IT recruiting agencies can help you find a job that suits your expectations the best. Remember, having support from the company and team is very important. The environment where you can rely on your colleagues can help you avoid burnout and stay productive. Eat, sleep, and exercise - that’s what your brain needs If you want to be better in your job, you have yo think about your body and mind. What your brain needs is quality food, sleep, and exercise. It’s easy to fall in a circle eat-sleep-code, but that’s not what it’s good for you. You have to realize how essential both resting and exercising is for your brain. So, prioritize things in your life, and you will be more productive. When you give yourself time to do things that matter, the possibility that you get burnout is lower. Make time for doing things that you like doing Did you know that hobbies can impact your work performance? Those who engaged in a creative hobby performed between 15-30 percent better at work. Separating some activities that you enjoy doing from your work is a recipe for a happy, well-balanced life. So, enjoy some free time with your family, draw, write, read, travel, or do whatever makes you happy. You will be happier not only with your work, but with life in general. There is always time for things that you like doing, so put your hobbies at your must-do list. Find time for the things you like doing Stop comparing yourself to others Often we compare ourselves to others when we should be focusing on our progress. This insecurity doesn’t necessarily happen just at the beginning of a career. Sometimes we feel like we are stuck on one level and we don’t know what the next step is, so we start thinking about others and their progress. However, when we think about others, we lose focus on our progress. Some things aren’t comparable, so what you need is your own goal. Yes, big goals can’t be accomplished in a day, so you have to think small - what can make you a better programmer on a daily basis? Small things matters, so you have to make a long-term and short-term plan. Stop judging yourself and start making first steps that will help you boost your career. So, focus, understand, and then deliberately practice things you planned. Conclusion: If you burnout, you won’t be productive It’s important to stop for a moment if you notice any symptom from this list. These first symptoms are the wake-up call for you - your body and mind are telling you to slow down. No job is worth losing your health for, so ask for a day off and analyze your condition. If you feel like you can’t deal with it on your own, you can always ask a professional psychologist for help. Also, check out Ed Finkler’s Open Sourcing Mental Illness website. He is helping those who are facing mental illness in the tech community. Burnout doesn't go away after a few days like a flue unless you make some changes in your life. These small changes can help you avoid a dangerous path of burnout, the path where your life becomes miserable. If you care about the work you are doing, but also about your family and friends, you need to avoid getting to that point. So, whenever you feel like you’re close to get burnout, remember that this feeling won’t help you. What you need is a rest, a clear head, and well-balanced life. In the end, Đekic is sending a message to those who are struggling at work: Find a purpose. If you can't find it, create purpose. Change when necessary. Take care of yourself. Be awesome. Share with us your burnout story. We are here for you!
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Senior UX Designer

Full time, January 12, 2019

Our client is an international domain registrar and web hosting company looking for a Senior User Experience Designer to join their team in Belgrade. Read more...

Scrum Master

Full time, January 11, 2019

B2B, Scrum, Agile Read more...

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💻You won't get noticed on #LinkedIn unless you start thinking strategically! Find out How to Make #Recruiters Come to You 👉 https://t.co/DIxqyYEjSP

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