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How to hire a suitable tech recruiter

You don’t have to be a recruiting expert or a hiring master mind to know there are certain rules and requirements that need to be obeyed and fulfilled in order to have a fully functional and above all motivated team. Welcoming new members aboard can get surprisingly difficult sometimes (even if you followed all the instruction and your instincts too). Recruitment agencies are there to help you avoid these situations, but you should acknowledge the fact they’re not unmistakable either.   The good news is that chances of having hiring doubts and problems can certainly be minimized (let’s not be pretentious and speak of completely eliminating these odds, at least for now). Good HR strategy can substitute the usage of crystal ball and help you spot potential problems before they actually occur.    And you’d need the right staff to create a successful staffing strategy. There’s a whole set of rules and distinctions when it comes to recruiters too.

What does it take to succeed as a tech recruiter?

  • Dedication with a dash of gazing 
First indicator of crafty (and hirable) IT recruiter is patience. Recruiting, when being done properly, requires time. If someone’s willing to tiptoe around a LinkedIn profile (and possibly around other social media profiles - no stalking potential intended), plus to be regularly checking out other platforms and sources, he might be a keeper. This patient tech recruiter will look into (almost) everything that can possibly be useful and found online. He’ll track down information about candidates (and clients when needed) and he’ll categorize it carefully and methodically.    Keeping colleagues in loop and keeping files, CVs, documents and information organized will contribute to success of the whole team involved in recruiting and hiring (no matter how big or small the team might be). Even if there’s one single recruiter working for you, his behavior and competence (or the lack of it) might easily effect the entire company.    So - Don’t choose a sloppy recruiter, he’s almost destined to mix up names and available positions and the next thing you know – you’re hiring a Senior Ancient Greek Satyr (priceless for development of 5th century B.C. theater but inexplicably bad if you’re developing a team of IT experts).    And here’s the thing – every recruiter should examine those professional (and/or social) networks. But he has to know about boundaries and make sure never to cross certain lines.   
  • The thin line between being thorough and plain scary 
The worst case scenario – a recruiter being desperate and needy. If a recruiter messes up big time and confuses a bunch of stuff, or seriously mispronounces some names and tech terms – there’s still a possibility they’ll miraculously manage to persuade a developer into considering their job offer. However, being winy or tedious will surely get them a one way ticket to “seen”.     If you’re looking to hire a tech recruiter, make sure he knows how to deal with deadlines, stress and ultimately – each recruiter must know how to communicate and distinguish persistence from perpetual, compulsive texting. The kind of individual that’s willing to exchange quality for quantity is very much likely to send texts without true substance (which will lead to extremely poor response rate, and then back to more pointless texting).   Yes, recruitment gets difficult sometimes, the market keeps getting more competitive and everyone’s in a hurry to hire. But this is no excuse for anyone to come off as borderline obsessive. Following up every now and then is a must, just make sure they know the frequency limit before they end up characterized as literal head-hunters.   (x) Cold-calling is out of the question. (x) Emailing or texting until you’re blocked, banned, or ostracized are not allowed. (x) Generic texts and copy-paste messages aren’t welcome. (x) Irrelevant information and redundancy are inadequate and will most likely be ignored.  
  • The importance of questions and coffee
Recruiter is indirectly taking part in your employer branding. This is the person that should represent your company with all its’ values. They need to be fully aware of the priorities and they should be asking questions about basically everything.   

Be specific about what truly matters so they can spread the word. 

Let’s imagine for a moment you’re contemplating a career change. You’re receiving some offers and this really poetic text hits your mailbox. You’re being informed about some utopia among IT companies, everyone there has some cool Tolkien - like title and they’re all having so much coffee you can’t help but wonder if the job’s actually on a plantation.  Feeling special because you received an offer like this yet? Of course not, you know better. So does a (potentially) good recruiter.  

Attention, employers! Do not withhold information from our fellow recruiter.

If the employer (or some other person in charge) doesn’t provide a recruiter with the necessary information, the result might sound like random babbling about unicorns, rock stars, vegan burgers etc.   

Recruiter needs to be all about the questions. 

And they need to be well informed and up to date. You should be looking for a tech oriented HR enthusiast who’s asking the right kind of questions and who’s able to correctly rank benefits from “very important” to “wow, look – a doormat that glows in the dark”. It’s easy to spot a person who’s eager to learn and develop new skills. Successful recruitment has very little to do with seniority itself sometimes. Have this in mind while hiring:
Experience does not necessarily equal the amount of time spent doing something.
They should be asking significant questions, and so should you. 
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5 simple Interview Etiquette Rules

Interviews have become inevitable parts of hiring process in basically every domain nowadays. When it comes to tech oriented companies and IT experts, this whole hiring process usually consists in two separate types of question sections. Recruiting and staffing companies or HR departments and in-house HR managers often represent the initial part of this procedure.

 

There’s more to recruitment than checking out LinkedIn profiles, collecting CV’s and making developers count tennis balls in an imaginary school bus. These interviews should be carefully prepared with the idea to provide and collect all of the relevant information – from and to both ends. Both sides are entitled to be properly introduced to each other and that makes this hiring chapter significant.

 

There are a few pretty simple rules that can be applied to various situations and sections of daily working life, and everyone seems to be forgetting about those rules every now and then. These seemingly small gestures and tiny inadequacies can make a big impact sometimes, especially if they coincide with a job interview.

 

1. First impression – Avoid cases of mistaken identities and typos

Before a candidate officially arrives to the interview, some emailing is unavoidable – there must be at least a brief invite and confirmation involved. Someone might be in a hurry or someone might lack the concentration for only a moment, and it’s when Murphy’s Law kicks in and creates cringe worthy texts.

 

IT recruiters have a lot on their hands and on their minds. It’s easy to make a simple mistake and send out a wrong message.

 
  • One of the most common mistakes is typing in a wrong name. There are numerous reasons for this to happen and it can actually be perfectly understandable in some, if not the majority of cases. But the cold harsh fact is that if a recruiter makes this sort of a mistake, there’s an insanely high percent of chance that a developer will rather change his name than agree to change his job.
 

And yes, this addressing malfunction is usually presumed as a typical copy-paste syndrome and recruiters can be scolded to infinity and beyond when something like this occurs. But it’s a two way street and this goes out for everyone: Dear Recruiters and other tech and non-tech people, double check your texts before sending them. It’s cool to take a moment and make sure you’ve got everything right.

 
  • This double checking also implies typos and similar errors, disastrous products of autocorrect, grammar-nazi-proofing your emails etc. So sit back and take a quick glance at what you wrote.
 

2. Punctuality – First impression, part two

Once you’ve said yes to a meeting, make sure to arrive on time. This might easily seem like the most evident fact ever, but it somehow manages to become an obstacle in the most inconvenient moment. Calculate and recalculate the route you’re planning to use. Be careful when scheduling – think of the first step and double check your calendar, reminder, alarm clock, that one colleague that always remembers stuff, notebooks, agendas, or a fortune teller if necessary.

 

Knowing the value of time should be number one on everyone’s list of priorities. Not being able to achieve a goal or fulfil a task successfully within a previously agreed time frame can be interpreted as disrespect. It’s the same with showing up late at an appointment. And if that appointment happens to be a job interview – you’re a very unlikely candidate to be taken seriously. If you’re the person in charge of conducting the interview, well you’re just about equally doomed. Time quotes are related to way too many clichés, but time does need to be treated as one of the most valuable resources.

 

3. Dressed to recruit!

Another variable you should count in when having an interview (or a business meeting) is the appearance. Many IT and Recruiting companies, typically small businesses and small and/or remote staffing companies are about the laid back approach. It means flexibility in more than one aspect, and it surely means casual slash non existing dress code. But meeting a new client, business partner or employee could entail a new set of the rules.

 

Large IT companies or small IT companies with the tendency to appreciate suits and ties can hire (for example) a remote HR team. They might need sourcing or end-to-end recruiting services. And the team they’re looking to hire must fulfill the certain requirements regarding HR solutions and recruiting skills, but to them it’s also important to maintain the certain image.

 

Make no mistake – dressing for the occasion isn’t about the style itself, it’s about showing interest in a company’s culture. It’s being respectful. It’s also a part of necessary background checking.

 

So if you come from the track suit and yoga pants friendly working environment or from a remote job, take a good look at what’s appreciated in the company you’re paying a visit.

 

4. Did someone say background checking?

Each HR manager and IT recruiter should know the importance of assembling facts and information while doing their sourcing sorcery thing. They do need to keep track of literally everything regarding a hiring process – collecting and saving info, keeping colleagues in loop and sharing data.

 

And every tech recruitment agency must have its own system to preserve information and contacts. Recruiters are ought to use all sorts of tools in order to easily find details they need at any given time – documents, spreadsheets, etc. But it’s equally or more important to gather facts in the first place.

 

An HR must be thoroughly prepared for the interview. It does mean to have a good look at the CV, business and social media network profiles of a candidate etc. But it also requires some extra time to look up the company he’s currently working in or the last job he has had.

 

It would raise the right questions and hence lead to relevant answers – the recruiter will actually get to know about the candidate and his goals and values. This kind of approach might give the interview a much needed friendly factor and it would shift its concept from questionnaire-like form to an actual conversation.

Which leads us to the next subject.

 

5. How many golf balls can fit into an angry developer?

As we just established – inducing the right questions is the proper way to conduct an interview. What really matters is…

Well, it’s personal. It’s individual. It’s changeable. It depends on numerous factors.

And you, fellow recruiters, should hear all about it. Rather than asking textbook questions let the candidates speak their mind. Be genuine and kind of spontaneous.

OK, we need to face one fact – some of those “typical HR questions” are actually a must. No one is particularly impressed by them, but some bits of interviews have their purpose and should be accepted as such – less than fun but more than obligatory.

 

Asking these questions about someone’s actual aspirations and intentions will give a recruiter the insight in what might interest a candidate. And his preferences are mainly not about the new coffee machine or a possibility of beer pong tournament. 

 

Tell them about some truly good, and we’re speaking LONG TERM good stuff your client or employee has to offer.

 

Members of remote HR solutions teams or IT recruiting agencies need to go an extra mile in order to become deeply familiar with all of their clients’ requirements and with their goals and plans. And their clients must be aware of this and keep them posted and well informed.

 

These are some fundamental methods and tricks a successful recruitment strategy should consist of. We’d be happy to hear and/or say more about this subject. Let us know what you find significant and let’s do our best to improve hiring process.

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The difference between remote and freelance jobs

The number of people in favor of remote jobs is increasing fast these days. This type of employment is especially popular among tech related people – developers and other IT experts, but IT recruitment agencies too. It’s no wonder this kind of employment is getting lots of attention and positive reviews because there’s so much good to it. Working from home or from a remote location does necessary require more discipline and lots of planning, and it certainly doesn’t work perfectly for everyone, but it has the goods to back up all of its shortcomings.

This time we’ll focus on similarities and crucial differences between working remotely and freelancing. Many people struggle while deciding which one would suit them and their lifestyle, while others are just not sure about the accurate meaning of these terms. And who could blame them, it's hard to tell the difference. 

One thing is almost axiomatic – all tech talents are looking forward to working from home at least every once in a while, and most of them would gladly try their luck working for a remote client. Many HR departments and recruitment teams can verify the accuracy of this theory. Staffing agencies are often asked by developers and IT experts if they have job openings of this kind.

Remote and freelance jobs are seemingly alike, but there are some pretty significant factors that separate them.

It wouldn’t matter where you are located or what you’re wearing for neither one of these jobs. You are trustworthy and reliable, you have the skills and the enthusiasm, you have a fully functional computer (or another weapon of choice) and the internet access. These are the inevitable premises to succeed working remotely or as a freelancer.

So, both remote and freelance career choices will provide you with a great deal of freedom. But to work remotely actually does mean to be “conventionally hired”. Everything is pretty much regular, there’s a contract involved and the working hours are often implied (probably flexible, negotiable or part-time but still - they’re often mandatory). The only thing that’s excluded from the deal is the office.

Contracts and obligations

A fully remote job means to be hired by a company or an organization. It is a home-based job but it involves constant virtual presence via communication channels like Slack, Skype, Hangouts and sometimes even using employee monitoring softwares, such as Time Doctor.

Although companies don’t require developers that work remotely to physically make an appearance, they do need to be present. Their work would be evaluated from time to time and they would be communicating continuously with everyone working on the project.  Just like any employee, you would get an assignments and your responsibility would be to complete successfully.

To be a freelancer does equal to have all the autonomy and liberty to make decisions about projects and/or clients. And this autonomy also means they’re not bound by contracts in majority of cases and they can turn down a job offer at any time.

Freelancers, however, don’t have this type of obligations. Their jobs have nothing to do with working hours, they schedule all of the activities and assignments the way they find convenient. It usually involves fulfilling tasks during a period of time that’s been previously agreed. Once you are done, you are free to move to the next project. And their work is being far less monitored by a client. It’s actually almost the other way around – freelancers sometimes need to present their own ideas to make things work. 

The selection process

If you are using platforms like Upwork or Freelancer you know how hard it is to land a freelance job these days. Most of the time, lowest bids win. On the other hand, companies that hire remotely usually have two things on mind: (1) do you have the hard skills to do the job and (2) can you communicate efficiently within a remote team? This usually leads to a way more rigorous selection process. You will apply for a remote position and you will have to prove the requirements on interviews, tests and more interviews. Hiring remote team members requires a well structured selection process. The thin line between freelancing a working remotely lies in the fact that..
Developing a long term relationship with the client on your freelance job may turn into a full time remote position.
Can you tell the difference now?

The Uncertainty

The coolness factor of freelancers’ life is mixed with the uncertainty. They have only themselves to rely on when it comes to finding a client. The source of income might not always be available and this kind of crises is what makes everything shaky and stressful. This is probably the reason why remote job feels more secure and might turn out to be a better option for some.

  [caption id="attachment_220" align="alignleft" width="300"] Nope. Nothing out there.[/caption]   You will have to plan every single detail. There are those situations that are completely out of your control and can make you look unprofessional. We were coming back from a weekend get away with the idea to have a call with an important candidate during a stop on a gas station. Our car broke down in the middle of highway. We had no signal, so we couldn't even let the candidate know we can't make it. We also didn't have water, but that's another story. (Please take lots of water when traveling by car).

The Loneliness

The downside to both freelance and remote positions is that people might get lonely or bored at some point. Luckily, these problems are easy to overcome. The trick is to maintain a high level of concentration and dose the amounts of other daily needs and interactions. It just takes time get used to working from home. Once you work out a strategy to be productive and don’t miss out on the fun stuff, you’ve got it all. You’ll do what you like and what you do best and be appreciated by your pen friend boss, even though you’re working from the living room couch with your socks turned inside out or from under a coconut tree. 

What’s your story? Would you be interested in working from home or from an unusual location you always wanted to visit? 

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What is Pay per Stay?

Switching jobs or looking for people to join your team takes a significant amount time and even more dedication. The entire hiring process implies a lot of searching and questioning on each end, but it also brings a certain feeling of accomplishment once this difficult task is successfully fulfilled. Our job is to be that link between talents and those who are looking for an opportunity to meet them and invite them to make their team even more exceptional and productive. Knowing we’ve done something good and contributed in someone’s career is what keeps us wanting to improve our ways. And we’re managing to grow by constantly finding solutions for problems our clients and candidates frequently come across. One of the ideas we came up with to make hiring easier and accessible for a variety of companies is called Pay per Stay method, and it’s actually very simple and efficient.

The Rubik’s cube

Each business owner is faced with numerous challenges and often with difficult decision making. The responsibility for maintaining each part of the company highly functional becomes a standard part of the daily routine. To put this simply, here’s what it is like for an entrepreneur: a coffee break followed by a full time contemplating and “what if”-ing section of the day.
Even though there are many amazing people with all the necessary skill sets, knowledge and all kinds of mojo any company would gladly welcome aboard, there are numerous small but inevitable factors one must have in mind when hiring.
Finding “the perfect match” is like trying to solve a Rubik’s cube – everything must fall right into place. Only in this case it’s a little less colorful and far more realistic. This Rubik’s cube is about structuring many elements, but these might pop up as the most important ones – the candidate must have certain tech skills required for the certain position, then there’s the part that’s often called “a culture fit” (and we’ll use this term until we come up with a more suitable one), and there is the always tricky question of a budget. Luckily, this is when our Pay per Stay method jumps in and saves the day. Or at least saves you from the notorious so called cash burnout syndrome. Before reviling the actual concept of this payment method let’s take a moment and explain what collaborating with us implies. Our number one priority is to collect all the relevant information about you and your company in order to reach out to the right crowd. Your first step would be to provide us with all the details about your current aspirations and future plans. And we’ll handle the rest – sourcing, screening and interviewing would be our preoccupations. Your next task is to check your inbox regularly and have a look at all the resumes we collected. It’s time for you to get introduced to experts interested in your projects and eager to hear more about what is it that you do.

The What Ifs

After carefully considering resumes and getting properly introduced to the candidates, you chose to hire someone. No matter how thoroughly we searched for suitable candidates, there is always a variety of potential scenarios, and unfortunately there’s always a slim chance something might not turn out as you planned. So, in case you decide that a person you hired does not entirely meet your expectations after all, you would need to do something about it. And that “something” is usually a code word for terminating the contact in majority of cases like this. What comes next? Well, our Pay per Stay method would surely cut your expenses if something like this happens.
And hopefully it will also cut your stress level in half.
The agreement we would offer you consists in dividing your payments for our services into 12 equal monthly fees. Think of it as a sort of insurance that if things go wrong you won’t be losing both – the new employee and the capital you invested in this whole hiring process.

The honest model

If we’re all down on our luck and your collaboration with the employee we introduced you to breaks for whatever reason, we would immediately stop charging you. The next step is entirely your choice – we could look further and find someone to take the first candidate’s place. We would appreciate any feedback from you and it would be more than helpful if you provided us with as many details about what went wrong as possible.  This way we can have all the pieces of this hiring puzzle together while looking for a new member to join your team. If you go for this option and let us keep searching for the person that will fit perfectly into your team, the payment method would remain the same. But the very good news for you is that we wouldn’t start charging you from the very beginning once you hire one of our candidates again. For example, if the first candidate you’ve decided to hire leaves after two months and after a while a new one comes along and you choose to welcome him to your team, we would send out our monthly fees as from the third month. All kinds of expenses on your end would just be paused for a while so that you can retain the necessary resources until we find a definitive match.
This brief introduction is meant to show a little bit of what we stand for.
Pay per Stay method of charging was created with the idea to encourage those who are in charge of smaller teams with the tendency to grow and those who are looking for a way to start their own business. What triggered this idea is the fact we are also a small group of people gathered around a goal to do something big that would hopefully have a positive impact on everyone we work with. Feel free to get touch with us. We would love to hear from you and get to know you. And we’ll gladly tell you more about our approach and our ways of making hiring easier and cost effective.
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