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How to hire a suitable tech recruiter

You don’t have to be a recruiting expert or a hiring master mind to know there are certain rules and requirements that need to be obeyed and fulfilled in order to have a fully functional and above all motivated team. Welcoming new members aboard can get surprisingly difficult sometimes (even if you followed all the instruction and your instincts too). Recruitment agencies are there to help you avoid these situations, but you should acknowledge the fact they’re not unmistakable either.   The good news is that chances of having hiring doubts and problems can certainly be minimized (let’s not be pretentious and speak of completely eliminating these odds, at least for now). Good HR strategy can substitute the usage of crystal ball and help you spot potential problems before they actually occur.    And you’d need the right staff to create a successful staffing strategy. There’s a whole set of rules and distinctions when it comes to recruiters too.

What does it take to succeed as a tech recruiter?

  • Dedication with a dash of gazing 
First indicator of crafty (and hirable) IT recruiter is patience. Recruiting, when being done properly, requires time. If someone’s willing to tiptoe around a LinkedIn profile (and possibly around other social media profiles - no stalking potential intended), plus to be regularly checking out other platforms and sources, he might be a keeper. This patient tech recruiter will look into (almost) everything that can possibly be useful and found online. He’ll track down information about candidates (and clients when needed) and he’ll categorize it carefully and methodically.    Keeping colleagues in loop and keeping files, CVs, documents and information organized will contribute to success of the whole team involved in recruiting and hiring (no matter how big or small the team might be). Even if there’s one single recruiter working for you, his behavior and competence (or the lack of it) might easily effect the entire company.    So - Don’t choose a sloppy recruiter, he’s almost destined to mix up names and available positions and the next thing you know – you’re hiring a Senior Ancient Greek Satyr (priceless for development of 5th century B.C. theater but inexplicably bad if you’re developing a team of IT experts).    And here’s the thing – every recruiter should examine those professional (and/or social) networks. But he has to know about boundaries and make sure never to cross certain lines.   
  • The thin line between being thorough and plain scary 
The worst case scenario – a recruiter being desperate and needy. If a recruiter messes up big time and confuses a bunch of stuff, or seriously mispronounces some names and tech terms – there’s still a possibility they’ll miraculously manage to persuade a developer into considering their job offer. However, being winy or tedious will surely get them a one way ticket to “seen”.     If you’re looking to hire a tech recruiter, make sure he knows how to deal with deadlines, stress and ultimately – each recruiter must know how to communicate and distinguish persistence from perpetual, compulsive texting. The kind of individual that’s willing to exchange quality for quantity is very much likely to send texts without true substance (which will lead to extremely poor response rate, and then back to more pointless texting).   Yes, recruitment gets difficult sometimes, the market keeps getting more competitive and everyone’s in a hurry to hire. But this is no excuse for anyone to come off as borderline obsessive. Following up every now and then is a must, just make sure they know the frequency limit before they end up characterized as literal head-hunters.   (x) Cold-calling is out of the question. (x) Emailing or texting until you’re blocked, banned, or ostracized are not allowed. (x) Generic texts and copy-paste messages aren’t welcome. (x) Irrelevant information and redundancy are inadequate and will most likely be ignored.  
  • The importance of questions and coffee
Recruiter is indirectly taking part in your employer branding. This is the person that should represent your company with all its’ values. They need to be fully aware of the priorities and they should be asking questions about basically everything.   

Be specific about what truly matters so they can spread the word. 

Let’s imagine for a moment you’re contemplating a career change. You’re receiving some offers and this really poetic text hits your mailbox. You’re being informed about some utopia among IT companies, everyone there has some cool Tolkien - like title and they’re all having so much coffee you can’t help but wonder if the job’s actually on a plantation.  Feeling special because you received an offer like this yet? Of course not, you know better. So does a (potentially) good recruiter.  

Attention, employers! Do not withhold information from our fellow recruiter.

If the employer (or some other person in charge) doesn’t provide a recruiter with the necessary information, the result might sound like random babbling about unicorns, rock stars, vegan burgers etc.   

Recruiter needs to be all about the questions. 

And they need to be well informed and up to date. You should be looking for a tech oriented HR enthusiast who’s asking the right kind of questions and who’s able to correctly rank benefits from “very important” to “wow, look – a doormat that glows in the dark”. It’s easy to spot a person who’s eager to learn and develop new skills. Successful recruitment has very little to do with seniority itself sometimes. Have this in mind while hiring:
Experience does not necessarily equal the amount of time spent doing something.
They should be asking significant questions, and so should you. 
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5 simple Interview Etiquette Rules

Interviews have become inevitable parts of hiring process in basically every domain nowadays. When it comes to tech oriented companies and IT experts, this whole hiring process usually consists in two separate types of question sections. Recruiting and staffing companies or HR departments and in-house HR managers often represent the initial part of this procedure.

 

There’s more to recruitment than checking out LinkedIn profiles, collecting CV’s and making developers count tennis balls in an imaginary school bus. These interviews should be carefully prepared with the idea to provide and collect all of the relevant information – from and to both ends. Both sides are entitled to be properly introduced to each other and that makes this hiring chapter significant.

 

There are a few pretty simple rules that can be applied to various situations and sections of daily working life, and everyone seems to be forgetting about those rules every now and then. These seemingly small gestures and tiny inadequacies can make a big impact sometimes, especially if they coincide with a job interview.

 

1. First impression – Avoid cases of mistaken identities and typos

Before a candidate officially arrives to the interview, some emailing is unavoidable – there must be at least a brief invite and confirmation involved. Someone might be in a hurry or someone might lack the concentration for only a moment, and it’s when Murphy’s Law kicks in and creates cringe worthy texts.

 

IT recruiters have a lot on their hands and on their minds. It’s easy to make a simple mistake and send out a wrong message.

 
  • One of the most common mistakes is typing in a wrong name. There are numerous reasons for this to happen and it can actually be perfectly understandable in some, if not the majority of cases. But the cold harsh fact is that if a recruiter makes this sort of a mistake, there’s an insanely high percent of chance that a developer will rather change his name than agree to change his job.
 

And yes, this addressing malfunction is usually presumed as a typical copy-paste syndrome and recruiters can be scolded to infinity and beyond when something like this occurs. But it’s a two way street and this goes out for everyone: Dear Recruiters and other tech and non-tech people, double check your texts before sending them. It’s cool to take a moment and make sure you’ve got everything right.

 
  • This double checking also implies typos and similar errors, disastrous products of autocorrect, grammar-nazi-proofing your emails etc. So sit back and take a quick glance at what you wrote.
 

2. Punctuality – First impression, part two

Once you’ve said yes to a meeting, make sure to arrive on time. This might easily seem like the most evident fact ever, but it somehow manages to become an obstacle in the most inconvenient moment. Calculate and recalculate the route you’re planning to use. Be careful when scheduling – think of the first step and double check your calendar, reminder, alarm clock, that one colleague that always remembers stuff, notebooks, agendas, or a fortune teller if necessary.

 

Knowing the value of time should be number one on everyone’s list of priorities. Not being able to achieve a goal or fulfil a task successfully within a previously agreed time frame can be interpreted as disrespect. It’s the same with showing up late at an appointment. And if that appointment happens to be a job interview – you’re a very unlikely candidate to be taken seriously. If you’re the person in charge of conducting the interview, well you’re just about equally doomed. Time quotes are related to way too many clichés, but time does need to be treated as one of the most valuable resources.

 

3. Dressed to recruit!

Another variable you should count in when having an interview (or a business meeting) is the appearance. Many IT and Recruiting companies, typically small businesses and small and/or remote staffing companies are about the laid back approach. It means flexibility in more than one aspect, and it surely means casual slash non existing dress code. But meeting a new client, business partner or employee could entail a new set of the rules.

 

Large IT companies or small IT companies with the tendency to appreciate suits and ties can hire (for example) a remote HR team. They might need sourcing or end-to-end recruiting services. And the team they’re looking to hire must fulfill the certain requirements regarding HR solutions and recruiting skills, but to them it’s also important to maintain the certain image.

 

Make no mistake – dressing for the occasion isn’t about the style itself, it’s about showing interest in a company’s culture. It’s being respectful. It’s also a part of necessary background checking.

 

So if you come from the track suit and yoga pants friendly working environment or from a remote job, take a good look at what’s appreciated in the company you’re paying a visit.

 

4. Did someone say background checking?

Each HR manager and IT recruiter should know the importance of assembling facts and information while doing their sourcing sorcery thing. They do need to keep track of literally everything regarding a hiring process – collecting and saving info, keeping colleagues in loop and sharing data.

 

And every tech recruitment agency must have its own system to preserve information and contacts. Recruiters are ought to use all sorts of tools in order to easily find details they need at any given time – documents, spreadsheets, etc. But it’s equally or more important to gather facts in the first place.

 

An HR must be thoroughly prepared for the interview. It does mean to have a good look at the CV, business and social media network profiles of a candidate etc. But it also requires some extra time to look up the company he’s currently working in or the last job he has had.

 

It would raise the right questions and hence lead to relevant answers – the recruiter will actually get to know about the candidate and his goals and values. This kind of approach might give the interview a much needed friendly factor and it would shift its concept from questionnaire-like form to an actual conversation.

Which leads us to the next subject.

 

5. How many golf balls can fit into an angry developer?

As we just established – inducing the right questions is the proper way to conduct an interview. What really matters is…

Well, it’s personal. It’s individual. It’s changeable. It depends on numerous factors.

And you, fellow recruiters, should hear all about it. Rather than asking textbook questions let the candidates speak their mind. Be genuine and kind of spontaneous.

OK, we need to face one fact – some of those “typical HR questions” are actually a must. No one is particularly impressed by them, but some bits of interviews have their purpose and should be accepted as such – less than fun but more than obligatory.

 

Asking these questions about someone’s actual aspirations and intentions will give a recruiter the insight in what might interest a candidate. And his preferences are mainly not about the new coffee machine or a possibility of beer pong tournament. 

 

Tell them about some truly good, and we’re speaking LONG TERM good stuff your client or employee has to offer.

 

Members of remote HR solutions teams or IT recruiting agencies need to go an extra mile in order to become deeply familiar with all of their clients’ requirements and with their goals and plans. And their clients must be aware of this and keep them posted and well informed.

 

These are some fundamental methods and tricks a successful recruitment strategy should consist of. We’d be happy to hear and/or say more about this subject. Let us know what you find significant and let’s do our best to improve hiring process.

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Working remotely – knowledge sharing

Omnes organizuje svoj prvi meetup u Starit centru u Novom Sadu, 06. decembra u 18č. Namenjen svima koji se nose idejom o započinjanju rada u remote timu, ali i onima koji su već članovi remote timova. Da li ste se ikada zapitali kako je raditi od kuće, kao nezavisni kontraktor ili kako da ispregovarate bolje uslove u takvim radnom okruženju? Ukoliko želite da saznate više o alatima koji poboljšavaju produktivnost u remote timovima i da čujete iskustva ljudi koji rade ili su radili remote, pridružite nam se na prvom meetupu koji organizujemo u Novom Sadu. Meetup namenjen svima koji se nose idejom o započinjanju rada u remote timu, ali i onima koji su već članovi remote timova. Razmena iskustava u svrhu obaveštenosti o dobrim i lošim stranama rada na daljinu, u timu sa ljudima koje poznajemo često isključivo preko ekrana. Meetup će se održati u Startit Centar Novi Sad, 6. decembra sa početkom u 18č.  

Badcop

Aleksandar Stojanović, ili Mačka, će biti loš pajkan i malo će vam utuliti želju da radite remote. Ovaj vođa beše-nekad-remote-tima, koji broji 16+ članova, pričaće vam o razlozima zašto je remote nezahvalan, i gde možete da očekujete na zastoje.  

Goodcop

Milan Ivanović je naš dobar pajkan. Jedan od osnivača WordPress zajednice Srbije, i zaljubljenik u fotografiju. Pričaće o produktivnosti pojedinca u radu u remote timu, kao i o alatima za postizanje optimalnog rada u remote timovima.   Prijave su obavezne, jer nam je broj mesta ograničen. Prijavite se OVDE.  Nakon što se prijavite, sve što treba da uradite je da se pojavite (ne brinite, podsetićemo vas). Nema kotizacija i sličnih formalnosti. Vidimo se!
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2 smart ways to elevate your career

Career is an important part of our lives, not just in context of earning money, but also when it comes to self-realization, confidence, overall satisfaction and our identity. If you wish to elevate your career, there are certain steps you could take and good changes you could make regardless of your industry or seniority.

Underpromise and overdeliver

If you’re excited and enthusiastic about your work, which, of course, is a great thing, it can happen that you exaggerate a bit or overestimate your capabilities at a given time. It doesn’t have to be anything drastic, but if you create expectations you cannot deliver on, you can get in trouble and send a negative message instead. For instance, if you have a project to finish, and you think you will need around a week, it’s always better to give yourself a bit more time when committing to a deadline. Extra day or two will be a great buffer (in case of unexpected situations or challenges), and it will also give you room to over-deliver and delight your coworkers and team leaders/managers. If you commit to finishing the project within a week and deliver as expected, the reaction wouldn’t be as positive as if you finished a bit earlier than expected. Of course, if you deliver even slightly after the deadline, you can’t expect the reaction to be positive at all. That’s why, in the end, being too enthusiastic and overestimating your capabilities can get you in trouble. Remember the three situations we listed, and imagine that you finished project in a week. In reality, it took you the same time, but depending on what you promised, the results would be drastically different. Set realistic expectations and try to over-deliver. It’s always better to show your enthusiasm through work (results), than to show it by words, and then fail to deliver on promises.

Stay up to date and have a learner’s mindset

We live in exciting times with a lot of constant innovation and new discoveries in every field, which is really amazing. On the other hand, it is also challenging, as we always need to adapt to the newest trends and keep up with innovation. If you think of your previous education, and go back a few years in time, the chances are that something you’ve learned back in the days is totally different today. Maybe there are other tools or ways of doing it, or maybe your job as such didn’t even exist at the time. Just think of how many people work with Social Media nowadays, and both Snapchat and Instagram were created less than 10 years ago, while Facebook saw the light of the day in 2004, became open for everyone in 2006 and needed a few year before it really took off. In our environment nowadays, the only constant thing is change. And that’s why you have to stay up to date. Try out new tools, new ways of doing things, new ways of thinking… Get as much knowledge (and contacts) at different seminars, webinars, conferences and events. And remember to have a learner’s mindset: be open to new things, be open to failing and learning from your fails and try to find and use every possibility for improvement. If you work hard and follow these 2 simple rules, we’re sure you can elevate your career and be happier and more satisfied both in professional and personal life.
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