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How to hire a suitable tech recruiter

You don’t have to be a recruiting expert or a hiring master mind to know there are certain rules and requirements that need to be obeyed and fulfilled in order to have a fully functional and above all motivated team. Welcoming new members aboard can get surprisingly difficult sometimes (even if you followed all the instruction and your instincts too). Recruitment agencies are there to help you avoid these situations, but you should acknowledge the fact they’re not unmistakable either.   The good news is that chances of having hiring doubts and problems can certainly be minimized (let’s not be pretentious and speak of completely eliminating these odds, at least for now). Good HR strategy can substitute the usage of crystal ball and help you spot potential problems before they actually occur.    And you’d need the right staff to create a successful staffing strategy. There’s a whole set of rules and distinctions when it comes to recruiters too. What does it take to succeed as a tech recruiter? Dedication with a dash of gazing  First indicator of crafty (and hirable) IT recruiter is patience. Recruiting, when being done properly, requires time. If someone’s willing to tiptoe around a LinkedIn profile (and possibly around other social media profiles - no stalking potential intended), plus to be regularly checking out other platforms and sources, he might be a keeper. This patient tech recruiter will look into (almost) everything that can possibly be useful and found online. He’ll track down information about candidates (and clients when needed) and he’ll categorize it carefully and methodically.    Keeping colleagues in loop and keeping files, CVs, documents and information organized will contribute to success of the whole team involved in recruiting and hiring (no matter how big or small the team might be). Even if there’s one single recruiter working for you, his behavior and competence (or the lack of it) might easily effect the entire company.    So - Don’t choose a sloppy recruiter, he’s almost destined to mix up names and available positions and the next thing you know – you’re hiring a Senior Ancient Greek Satyr (priceless for development of 5th century B.C. theater but inexplicably bad if you’re developing a team of IT experts).    And here’s the thing – every recruiter should examine those professional (and/or social) networks. But he has to know about boundaries and make sure never to cross certain lines.    The thin line between being thorough and plain scary  The worst case scenario – a recruiter being desperate and needy. If a recruiter messes up big time and confuses a bunch of stuff, or seriously mispronounces some names and tech terms – there’s still a possibility they’ll miraculously manage to persuade a developer into considering their job offer. However, being winy or tedious will surely get them a one way ticket to “seen”.     If you’re looking to hire a tech recruiter, make sure he knows how to deal with deadlines, stress and ultimately – each recruiter must know how to communicate and distinguish persistence from perpetual, compulsive texting. The kind of individual that’s willing to exchange quality for quantity is very much likely to send texts without true substance (which will lead to extremely poor response rate, and then back to more pointless texting).   Yes, recruitment gets difficult sometimes, the market keeps getting more competitive and everyone’s in a hurry to hire. But this is no excuse for anyone to come off as borderline obsessive. Following up every now and then is a must, just make sure they know the frequency limit before they end up characterized as literal head-hunters.   (x) Cold-calling is out of the question. (x) Emailing or texting until you’re blocked, banned, or ostracized are not allowed. (x) Generic texts and copy-paste messages aren’t welcome. (x) Irrelevant information and redundancy are inadequate and will most likely be ignored.   The importance of questions and coffee Recruiter is indirectly taking part in your employer branding. This is the person that should represent your company with all its’ values. They need to be fully aware of the priorities and they should be asking questions about basically everything.    Be specific about what truly matters so they can spread the word.  Let’s imagine for a moment you’re contemplating a career change. You’re receiving some offers and this really poetic text hits your mailbox. You’re being informed about some utopia among IT companies, everyone there has some cool Tolkien - like title and they’re all having so much coffee you can’t help but wonder if the job’s actually on a plantation.  Feeling special because you received an offer like this yet? Of course not, you know better. So does a (potentially) good recruiter.   Attention, employers! Do not withhold information from our fellow recruiter. If the employer (or some other person in charge) doesn’t provide a recruiter with the necessary information, the result might sound like random babbling about unicorns, rock stars, vegan burgers etc.    Recruiter needs to be all about the questions.  And they need to be well informed and up to date. You should be looking for a tech oriented HR enthusiast who’s asking the right kind of questions and who’s able to correctly rank benefits from “very important” to “wow, look – a doormat that glows in the dark”. It’s easy to spot a person who’s eager to learn and develop new skills. Successful recruitment has very little to do with seniority itself sometimes. Have this in mind while hiring: Experience does not necessarily equal the amount of time spent doing something. They should be asking significant questions, and so should you. 
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The difference between remote and freelance jobs

The number of people in favor of remote jobs is increasing fast these days. This type of employment is especially popular among tech related people – developers and other IT experts, but IT recruitment agencies too. It’s no wonder this kind of employment is getting lots of attention and positive reviews because there’s so much good to it. Working from home or from a remote location does necessary require more discipline and lots of planning, and it certainly doesn’t work perfectly for everyone, but it has the goods to back up all of its shortcomings. This time we’ll focus on similarities and crucial differences between working remotely and freelancing. Many people struggle while deciding which one would suit them and their lifestyle, while others are just not sure about the accurate meaning of these terms. And who could blame them, it's hard to tell the difference.  One thing is almost axiomatic – all tech talents are looking forward to working from home at least every once in a while, and most of them would gladly try their luck working for a remote client. Many HR departments and recruitment teams can verify the accuracy of this theory. Staffing agencies are often asked by developers and IT experts if they have job openings of this kind. Remote and freelance jobs are seemingly alike, but there are some pretty significant factors that separate them. It wouldn’t matter where you are located or what you’re wearing for neither one of these jobs. You are trustworthy and reliable, you have the skills and the enthusiasm, you have a fully functional computer (or another weapon of choice) and the internet access. These are the inevitable premises to succeed working remotely or as a freelancer. So, both remote and freelance career choices will provide you with a great deal of freedom. But to work remotely actually does mean to be “conventionally hired”. Everything is pretty much regular, there’s a contract involved and the working hours are often implied (probably flexible, negotiable or part-time but still - they’re often mandatory). The only thing that’s excluded from the deal is the office. Contracts and obligations A fully remote job means to be hired by a company or an organization. It is a home-based job but it involves constant virtual presence via communication channels like Slack, Skype, Hangouts and sometimes even using employee monitoring softwares, such as Time Doctor. Although companies don’t require developers that work remotely to physically make an appearance, they do need to be present. Their work would be evaluated from time to time and they would be communicating continuously with everyone working on the project.  Just like any employee, you would get an assignments and your responsibility would be to complete successfully. To be a freelancer does equal to have all the autonomy and liberty to make decisions about projects and/or clients. And this autonomy also means they’re not bound by contracts in majority of cases and they can turn down a job offer at any time. Freelancers, however, don’t have this type of obligations. Their jobs have nothing to do with working hours, they schedule all of the activities and assignments the way they find convenient. It usually involves fulfilling tasks during a period of time that’s been previously agreed. Once you are done, you are free to move to the next project. And their work is being far less monitored by a client. It’s actually almost the other way around – freelancers sometimes need to present their own ideas to make things work.  The selection process If you are using platforms like Upwork or Freelancer you know how hard it is to land a freelance job these days. Most of the time, lowest bids win. On the other hand, companies that hire remotely usually have two things on mind: (1) do you have the hard skills to do the job and (2) can you communicate efficiently within a remote team? This usually leads to a way more rigorous selection process. You will apply for a remote position and you will have to prove the requirements on interviews, tests and more interviews. Hiring remote team members requires a well structured selection process. The thin line between freelancing a working remotely lies in the fact that.. Developing a long term relationship with the client on your freelance job may turn into a full time remote position. Can you tell the difference now? The Uncertainty The coolness factor of freelancers’ life is mixed with the uncertainty. They have only themselves to rely on when it comes to finding a client. The source of income might not always be available and this kind of crises is what makes everything shaky and stressful. This is probably the reason why remote job feels more secure and might turn out to be a better option for some.   [caption id="attachment_220" align="alignleft" width="300"] Nope. Nothing out there.[/caption]   You will have to plan every single detail. There are those situations that are completely out of your control and can make you look unprofessional. We were coming back from a weekend get away with the idea to have a call with an important candidate during a stop on a gas station. Our car broke down in the middle of highway. We had no signal, so we couldn't even let the candidate know we can't make it. We also didn't have water, but that's another story. (Please take lots of water when traveling by car). The Loneliness The downside to both freelance and remote positions is that people might get lonely or bored at some point. Luckily, these problems are easy to overcome. The trick is to maintain a high level of concentration and dose the amounts of other daily needs and interactions. It just takes time get used to working from home. Once you work out a strategy to be productive and don’t miss out on the fun stuff, you’ve got it all. You’ll do what you like and what you do best and be appreciated by your pen friend boss, even though you’re working from the living room couch with your socks turned inside out or from under a coconut tree.  What’s your story? Would you be interested in working from home or from an unusual location you always wanted to visit? 
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8 Weirdest Programming Languages (that you have to check)

Some people would say that learning to program is hard and excruciating. Maybe these people are not born to be developers because programming languages are supposed to be easy to use and learn. However, some people think that there are not enough programming languages that challenge people, so they decided to make some weird, funny, frustrating languages. Some of them are completely meaningless and goes against all principles. The fact is that programming is fun for these people, so why wouldn’t they play with a code? So, let’s take a look at some of the weirdest and craziest programming languages. 1. LOLCODE As you can guess, this language is made up of lolspeak, the “language” used by lolcats. All words are capitalized and meme-fied, so you can almost imagine a cat using it! LOLCODE was designed by Adam Lindsay in 2007, a researcher at Lancaster University’s Computing Department. Although you won't be able to use LOLCODE for anything more than reading a file or writing text to the console, the hilarity, and charm of the language make up for its disadvantages. Take a look at the ‘Hello World!’ code below. You will see how adorable it is.   HAI CAN HAS STDIO? I HAS A VAR IM IN YR LOOP   UP VAR!!1   VISIBLE VAR   IZ VAR BIGGER THAN 10? KTHX IM OUTTA YR LOOP KTHXBYE 2. Rockstar How would you like to call yourself a rockstar programmer? It sounds great, and because of this joke programming language, it’s possible to become one. Rockstar is designed for creating computer programs that are also song lyrics and one of the reasons that Dylan Beattie made it is to stop recruiters and managers from referring to people as "rockstar programmers". Now you can have a sticker on their laptop saying “CERTIFIED ROCKSTAR DEVELOPER”. That’s rock'n'roll! Moreover, comments in Rockstar programs is strongly discouraged because it's up to the audience to find their own meaning.   Here is an example: inspired by here-document Rockstar supports a unique language feature known as poetic literals. It allows you to simultaneously initialize a variable and express your innermost angst.   My heart is true - initialises the variable my heart with the Boolean value true Tommy is nobody - initialises the variable Tommy with the value null using the nobody alias 3. TrumpScript It started as a jock that this is the programming language Trump would approve of - just as he is making America great again, owners hope that this language will make programming great again. Although development on this project has stopped, owners want to send a strong message. They think that this joke isn't funny anymore and want to make an influence on people to actually do something about serious problems in the world. For example, you can make a donation to charity instead of spending your time beating the "Trump is ridiculous" meme to death.   Here are several convenient features that TrumpScript uses:   No floating point numbers, only integers. America never does anything halfway. All numbers must be strictly greater than 1 million. The small stuff is inconsequential to us. There are no import statements allowed. All code has to be home-grown and American made. Instead of True and False, we have the keywords fact and lie. Only the most popular English words, Trump's favorite words, and current politician names can be used as variable names. Error messages are mostly quotes directly taken from Trump himself.   4. Brainf*ck This language is made to play with your mind - it is notoriously difficult to program in. Brainf*ck is not intended for practical use, but to challenge and amuse programmers. This is a minimalistic language that uses only eight commands and an instruction pointer, each made up of a single character. Creator Urban Müller was still a physics student when he made this language (in 1993). Since then this obscure language reached almost a cult following. Let’s see how a sample of the headache-inducing code that will print out "Hello world!" looks like:   ++++++++++[>+++++++>++++++++++>+++>+<<<<-]>++.>+.+++++++..+++.>++. <<+++++++++++++++.>.+++.------.--------.>+.>. 5. Shakespeare This interesting programming language uses the source code that looks exactly like a Shakespeare play. The characters in the play are variables and constants are decided by positive or negative nouns. For example, if Hamlet is a negative value, you can put him and another character on the stage and let that character insult Hamlet. You can add input and output by having someone tell a character to listen to their heart and speak their mind. You can see now why this program is so different than others - programming language includes characters, titles, scenes, acts, enter, and exit directives, making it look much like the plays of Shakespeare. A piece of code in Shakespeare is broken into Acts which contain Scenes in which characters (variables) interact: Act I: Hamlet's insults and flattery. Scene I: The insulting of Romeo. 6. Whitespace Most programming languages ignore whitespace characters, so Edwin Brady and Chris Morris created this language as an April Fools’ joke. Whitespace uses them as commands, ignoring non-whitespace characters instead. It understands only spaces, tabs and new lines. Here is an example (spaces are marked with an S and tabs with a T):   S S S T    S S T S S S T    S S S S S T T   S S T S T T    S S S S S T T   S T T S S T    S S S S S T T   S T T S S T    S S S S S T T   S T T T T T    S S S S S T S T T   S S T    S S S S S T S S S S S T   7. Velato This interesting programming language uses MIDI files as source code: the pattern of notes determines commands. Programmer-musicians will love Velato because they can compose a musical piece that fills the constraints necessary to compile to a working Velato program. Each song has a secret message and the program determines when it’s compiled as Velato. So, let’s make some music and code at the same time! 8. Chicken As crazy as this may sound, it’s the truth - this language allows only one world, and this word is “chicken”! Swedish programmer and creator of this language Torbjörn Söderstedt was inspired after hearing Doug Zongker’s parody of scientific speeches to make Chicken programming language. To write the whole code would take half the page and consist of nothing but the word ‘chicken’, so here is just a piece of code: chicken chicken chicken chicken chicken chicken chicken chicken chicken chicken chicken chicken chicken chicken chicken chicken chicken Conclusion The fact is that some of these languages made programmers totally confused, but some of these ideas influence the entire industry. There are hundreds of esoteric languages like those on our list. Some of them are made just for fun, some are meant to be just different from others, but there are few of them that want to send a strong message to the audience. Which programming language do you find the most interesting? Let us know!  
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Free Onboarding Template - how to set up a simple onboarding process?

One of the principal principles of IT recruiting is the need (and the ability) to keep all the information, files and documents perfectly categorized.  Each recruiting agency should develop their own system that will help them collect all data and keep team members and clients in loop. Luckily, there are numerous tools that can help recruiters keep track of applicants, CVs, interviews and appointments. Some of these tools should be frequently used in other segments of hiring process too. They can improve onboarding process and help your team welcome aboard new members with ease. What is Onboarding Process? Onboarding process is about welcoming a new employee onboard by helping them adapt to the new environment. It usually takes place within the first month and it implies introducing a new colleague to the rest of the team and to his new duties, schedule and responsibilities. Everyone on the team should be providing them with information and participate in making their adjustment period easy and stress free. Onboarding process should be done strategically but it must contain that certain something that distinguishes your team from others. Plan this process carefully and keep it friendly. Why is Onboarding Process important? Some researches show that it takes a year for new employees to fully adapt and reach the level of achievement their (veteran) colleagues are at. Not saying statistics lie, but a whole year does sound a little excessive. Especially if we have in mind there are many ways we can help out new colleagues. Being clear about tasks, targets, goals and objectives is mandatory. Your colleagues and employees are familiar with your ways, but it a newly hired person will most likely need some time to adjust to the environment. And the adjustment does depend on the onboarding process. Developing an onboarding program strategy and setting it in motion will most likely have a positive impact on your finances, among other things. The costs of losing an employee are way higher than the investment you’d make in onboarding process. Back to the researches and statistics - first year of employment does turn out to be crucial. Companies lose over 25% of all new employees within this period. Benefits 1. Improved employee performance It is known that a successful onboarding program has the power to increase employees’ productivity up to 54%. This program should be carefully planned and custom made - although some steps need to be followed, you should follow them in a way that suits your company. Stick to the plan and gradually incorporate a new member into your teams’ ways and daily occupations. 2. Increased employee retention Employee retention is another important aspect you need to look into and take care of. Losing a new employee can seriously damage your budget and affect your projects. Standardised onboarding process will largely contribute to the improvement of this aspect. Onboarding program done right will increase employee retention up to 50%. 3. Happier employees Happy and healthy working environment consists in various components. Cool projects and good organisation are just one part of the story. There’s more to team work than that. It’s important for everyone in your company to feel accepted and to feel free to ask questions and speak their minds. People on your team need the right amount of autonomy and some room to grow, but they’ll also need supportive and trustworthy environment. Onboarding program helps newly employed to feel welcome and to truly become part of the team. Setting up a basic onboarding process Each strategy is different, and that’s exactly how it should be done - each company should adjust the onboarding program to their needs, values, standards and goals. But no matter how you choose to plan and perform this program, it usually last lasts 30 days. These are the most common time frames: Pre-start Onboarding process should begin before the new employees’ official day one. It’s important to cover the initial “getting to know each other” ground. First impression and proper introduction are always those keynote thoughts that seem to stick with you for more than just a while. It’s also undoubtedly important to make sure all equipment is provided. This usually means getting a computer or a laptop for the employee, those devices should be on top of the list. There might be other stuff you’d want your employee to have, but those variables are mostly changeable. You should have a list of priorities and make sure all the necessary devices and things are at the office right on time and that they’re fully functional. First day You can start to incorporate a new colleague to the team by emailing them – they will appreciate it. You can provide them with some additional information and let them know you’re at their disposal. The email should be genuine and substantial and the HR writing it should be using the language that reflects the company’s culture. This opening email represents a virtual tour of the office. The virtual tour isn’t enough, and this is why it should be followed by an actual tour. Show them around, introduce them to colleagues face to face. Some anecdotes won’t do any harm either, let them see the fun and friendly side of the office (even if you’re corporate to the core). You should notify them about their rights and obligations at the very beginning. This is why you should have an employee handbook prepared in advance. Make sure it’s updated. If there are some forms to fill in (and they don’t necessarily need to wait for the starting day), you could send those over to them too. It will save them some time and the energy (yes, we can admit here and now – no one is particularly crazy about bureaucracy, especially on their first day). First week New employee should get to know a little bit about everyone and everything during the first week. Memorising colleagues names and nicknames might be the toughest job for some. Don’t forget to add them to mailing lists, Skype groups end other. Keeping them posted when it comes to daily tasks is easier if you include them in these discussions and threads. You should make sure they fully understood their duties and that they’re familiar with stacks you’re all using. First 30 days First month should be the period of familiarizing. It’s all about getting used to a new working environment and you should pay some extra attention to helping a new employee obtain a certain level of knowledge and understanding of his new position. Provide them with information, let them know if you have any suggestions and ask them about their opinion. Being supportive is a teamwork. Not only a new team member can pick up on what matters when it comes to a project itself, but they’ll get the impression they can rely on their colleagues. Free Template Onboarding Process Example for Tech Teams using Trello This Free Template Onboarding Example was made with love for small tech teams setting up an office in Serbia. Within this Trello board, you can find template B2B contracts, Sexual harassment template and much more documentation you might need when hiring. Trello is a task management app that helps you know Who is working on What based on a Kanban system developed to keep production level high. It's free and there are endless ways to use it. Join the board here. 
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Senior Front-end Engineer

Full time, August 13, 2018

JavaScript, ReactJS, REST Read more...

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